Curriculum Policy

INDEX

  1. Graduate School
  2. Master’s degree programs
  3. Doctoral degree programs
  4. School of Advanced Engineering
  5. Faculty of Engineering
  6. School of Architecture
  7. Faculty of Informatics

Graduate School

Master’s degree programs

We have formulated the following curricula to enable our graduates to contribute to advancements in the research they specialize in, as well as to enable them to become active members of society by acquiring the skills needed for professions requiring high levels of specialization.

Students explore specialized subjects to acquire sophisticated, specialized expertise as well as knowledge related to society and their occupations.

Students acquire the skills to use science and technology—including the communication skills required to carry out independent research, leadership and teamwork skills, creative thinking skills, skills related to lab experiments and planning, and the ability to follow the PDCA cycle—through advanced seminars, lab research activities in their affiliated laboratory, and the preparation of a master’s degree thesis.

Students acquire creative skills by preparing their master’s degree theses and through academic activities on and off-campus based on their profound understanding of specific, specialized fields. At the same time, they acquire the sense of ethics required of technicians and researchers.

Doctoral degree programs

We have formulated the following curricula to train our graduates to independently conduct creative research in their respective research fields.

Students acquire a high degree of specialized expertise by preparing their doctoral degree dissertations and papers for publication, as well as through academic activities on and off-campus. They also bolster their ability to use science and technology, including the communication skills required to carry out independent research, leadership and teamwork skills, creative thinking skills, skills related to lab experiments and planning, and the ability to use the PDCA cycle.

Students acquire creative skills in specialized areas of a wide range of fields by mastering their research.

Master’s degree programs

We have formulated the following curricula to enable our graduates to contribute to advancements in the research they specialize in, as well as to enable them to become active members of society by acquiring the skills needed for professions requiring high levels of specialization.

Students explore specialized subjects to acquire sophisticated, specialized expertise as well as knowledge related to society and their occupations.

Students acquire the skills to use science and technology—including the communication skills required to carry out independent research, leadership and teamwork skills, creative thinking skills, skills related to lab experiments and planning, and the ability to follow the PDCA cycle—through advanced seminars, lab research activities in their affiliated laboratory, and the preparation of a master’s degree thesis.

Students acquire creative skills by preparing their master’s degree theses and through academic activities on and off-campus based on their profound understanding of specific, specialized fields. At the same time, they acquire the sense of ethics required of technicians and researchers.

Mechanical Engineering Program

The Mechanical Engineering program has formulated the following curriculum to train engineers and researchers. The program enables them to acquire even higher levels of advanced, integrated expertise and skills after they have gained sufficient expertise in basic areas of energy engineering, material and process engineering, design engineering, measurement controls and robotics, and systems engineering, and provides them with the broad vision they need to engage in independent careers internationally.
  1. Students can take courses in multiple mechanical engineering fields, acquiring advanced expertise related to specialized fields.
  2. Students acquire the ability to fulfill their social responsibilities through pursuing advanced seminar subjects that enable them to gain a multifaceted understanding of their relationships to human society and science and technology.
  3. Students acquire the skills to apply everything from basic to advanced expertise, as well as to engage in creative technical development and research, through master’s degree thesis research.

Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Program

The Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering program has formulated the following curricula to train engineers and researchers to solve issues related to human lifestyles using their chemistry-based expertise.

Students acquire sophisticated, specialized expertise by taking course clusters in the fields of life sciences; organic, inorganic and metals chemistry; and the environment and systems. Particularly in Advanced Applied Chemistry A, students acquire the expertise they require as engineers and researchers by learning about the latest research and technology in academia and industry.

Students acquire the skills to use science and technology—including the communication skills required to carry out independent research, leadership and teamwork skills, creative thinking skills, skills related to lab experiments and planning, and the ability to follow the PDCA cycle—through their master’s degree theses and advanced seminars. The acquisition of those abilities is evaluated objectively during discussions with assistant faculty advisors, interim presentations, and presentations at academic conferences.

Additionally, students acquire creative abilities that enable them to respond to the challenges of reaching beyond their usual fields of specialization and into interdisciplinary fields through their master’s degree theses and presentations at academic conferences.

Electrical Engineering and Electronics Program

The Electrical Engineering and Electronics program’s curriculum is designed to enable students to acquire basic expertise in the four fields the program is divided into—energy conversion, measurement and controls, information and communications, and electronic devices. It is also meant to produce an even higher level of specialized expertise and enable flexible responses to the rapid global developments in electrical and electronic engineering, making it possible to acquire profound expertise and skills in respective fields. Students also gain skills in logical thinking, discussion, presentation, and thesis preparation skills in relation to research (advanced seminars) while doing their master’s degree dissertations.

Architecture Program

The Architecture program’s degree curriculum is formulated and implemented according to the following guidelines:

  1. Enhancement of specialized basic skills
  2. Acquisition of high levels of specialized expertise and skills
  3. Acquisition of the skills needed to identify issues, appropriately set the goals to solve them, and gather the information required to do that
  4. Acquisition of the skills needed to express one’s opinions appropriately, according to topic, and lead discussions
  5. Acquisition of the skills needed to develop one’s own thoughts in order to resolve issues and come up with solutions through repeated trial and error

Informatics Program

The Informatics program has formulated the following curriculum to produce graduates who can contribute to progress in informatics research, as well as to ensure they acquire the skills needed for professions that require high levels of specialization and to play active roles in society.

While exploring specialized subjects in five areas—basic studies, engineering, social sciences, interdisciplinary studies that combine these, and unexplored fields—students acquire a high level of specialized expertise along with knowledge related to society and occupations.

Students also acquire the skills to use science and technology—including the communication skills required to carry out independent research, leadership and teamwork skills, creative thinking skills, skills related to lab experiments and planning, and the ability to follow the PDCA cycle—through advanced seminars, lab research activities in their affiliated laboratories, and preparation of their master’s degree theses.

In addition, students acquire creative skills by preparing their master’s degree theses and through academic activities on and off-campus, based on their profound understanding of specialized informatics fields. At the same time, they acquire the sense of ethics required of technicians and researchers.

Systems Design Program

The Systems Design program has formulated curricula designed to develop the students’ technical and business problem-solving skills based on high levels of engineering skills and systematic expertise related to technical management, and enable them to put their English-language communication skills into practice in business venues worldwide.

1. The curriculum is composed of specialized courses in research-related fields—mechanical engineering, chemistry, electrical and electronic engineering, informatics, and architecture—and related subjects. Our instruction in basic expertise involves such things as the principles and fundamentals of specialized engineering fields related to individual research, with performance graded based on reports and tests.
2. The curriculum is composed of specialized management of technology (MOT) courses and related subjects, and our instruction involves basic expertise related to the field of technical management, with performance graded based on reports and tests.
3. The curriculum is composed of BPBL, EPBL, and Professional Reporting courses, delineating technical issues with a view to management perspectives. Based on the basic expertise acquired in 1 and 2 above, students develop the skills to propose solutions to those issues. Debriefing sessions and professional reports are used to assess research performance.

Doctoral degree programs

We have formulated the following curricula to train our graduates to independently conduct creative research in their respective research fields.

Students acquire a high degree of specialized expertise by preparing their doctoral degree dissertations and papers for publication, as well as through academic activities on and off-campus. They also bolster their ability to use science and technology, including the communication skills required to carry out independent research, leadership and teamwork skills, creative thinking skills, skills related to lab experiments and planning, and the ability to follow the PDCA cycle.

Students acquire creative skills in specialized areas of a wide range of fields by mastering their research.

Mechanical Engineering Program

The Mechanical Engineering program has formulated the following curricula to foster graduates who can conduct independent, creative research to solve issues related to human lifestyles using their mechanical expertise.

Students acquire a high degree of specialized expertise by preparing their doctoral degree dissertations and papers for publication, as well as through academic activities on and off-campus. At the same time, they boost their ability to use science and technology, including the skills required to carry out independent and pioneering research, think uniquely and creatively, perform lab work and planning, and follow the PDCA cycle.

Students acquire creative skills that enable them to challenge and respond in new fields of study by deepening knowledge in their specialized field.

Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Program

The Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering program has formulated the following curricula to foster graduates who can conduct independent, creative research to solve issues related to human lifestyles using their chemistry-based expertise.

Students acquire a high degree of specialized expertise by preparing their doctoral degree dissertations and papers for publication, as well as through academic activities on and off-campus. At the same time, they boost their ability to use science and technology, including the skills required to carry out independent and pioneering research, think uniquely and creatively, perform lab work and planning, and follow the PDCA cycle.

Students acquire creative skills that enable them to challenge and respond in new fields of study by deepening knowledge in their specialized field.

Electrical Engineering and Electronics Program

While acquiring a high level of expertise in specialized electrical and electronic engineering fields, students gain the skills to apply and develop that expertise. They also gain outstanding research and development skills, including the ability to identify and solve problems. Additionally, they acquire such skills as the ability to conduct discussions in English, along with presentation and composition skills, enabling them to be self-reliant researchers.

Architecture Program

The Architecture program doctoral degree curriculum is formulated and implemented according to the following guidelines:

  1. Training to provide graduates with high levels of wide-ranging expertise
  2. Training to enable graduates to learn basic, practical facts in specialized fields
  3. Training to enable graduates to understand underlying social factors
  4. Training to enable researchers and high-level professionals to structure research logically
  5. Training to enable researchers and high-level professionals to compose lucid theses and conduct research that earns the approval of society
  6. Training to enable researchers and high-level professionals to compile polished papers

Informatics Program

We have formulated the following curriculum to enable students to conduct independent, creative research in informatics research fields.

Students acquire a high degree of specialized expertise by preparing their doctoral degree dissertations and papers for publication, as well as through academic activities on and off-campus. At the same time, they boost their ability to use science and technology, including the skills required to carry out independent and pioneering research, think uniquely and creatively, perform lab work and planning, and follow the PDCA cycle.

Students acquire creative skills in specialized areas of a wide range of fields by mastering their research.

School of Advanced Engineering

Department of Chemistry and Life Science

The Department of Chemistry and Life Science has formulated the following curriculum designed to achieve our goal of training students to understand various biological phenomena through their knowledge of chemistry, as well as to identify new chemistry-related issues, taking hints from life processes.

Building on the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, they develop an understanding of various fields and the ability to think logically, with wide-ranging studies of the three areas covered in Cluster III’s specialized subjects: 1) organic chemistry, 2) life sciences, and 3) chemical biology—which is an interdisciplinary fusion of those two fields—using the respective course models for reference. Students will use this expertise and these skills to conduct thesis research that involves investigating such things as elucidating biological phenomena, synthesizing organic compounds that possess biological functions, isolating and structuring new natural products, evaluating pharmacological activity, and using biological functions to produce stable food supplies. In the process, they will master ways of approaching the unknown and methods for organizing their thinking.

We aim to produce graduates with multifaceted perspectives on the Earth and human society through teaching Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, and to provide them with practical skills, all while endeavoring to enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

Department of Applied Chemistry

We have formulated the following curriculum to achieve our goal of producing graduates who will employ the power of chemistry in support of people’s livelihoods and pioneer the future.

Building on the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, seminars in Cluster III’s specialized subjects are designed to develop basic theoretical and applicable skills with foundations in organic and inorganic, physical, and analytical chemistry, along with biochemistry. Students will perform experiments to increase their practical skills and develop the skills to solve problems through the power of chemistry.

Furthermore, third-year students and above will enhance their specialization in the Lifestyle and Food Chemistry course, mastering technology related to the materials around us and the foodstuffs/bio-tech field; and the Applied Chemistry course, mastering cutting-edge technology, including polymer and catalytic chemistry, nanotechnology and next-generation energy.

We also aim to produce graduates with multifaceted perspectives on the Earth and human society through teaching Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, and to provide them with practical skills, all while endeavoring to enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

Department of Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

The Department of Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Engineering has formulated the following curriculum to achieve the goal of producing graduates able to contribute to a sustainable society by developing technology to preserve the environment, employing the most advanced science and technology to create low-environmental-load materials and energy technologies.

Building on the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, Cluster III’s specialized subjects emphasize unit operations and device design methodologies in chemical engineering on the basis of specialized basic chemistry subjects—including physical, analytical, organic, and inorganic chemistry—developing the skills to solve various environment-related technical issues from chemical engineering perspectives.

To that end, we have established three courses that navigate students through their graduation research: the Environmental Systems Engineering course, in which students obtain an understanding of the reality of environmental problems and master methods for solving technical issues related to environmental preservation and restoration; the Environment Materials Chemistry course, in which they master methods for solving technical issues related to environment- and energy-related materials and processes; and the Environmental Assessment and Design course, in which they master methods for employing environmental impact assessments and computational chemistry to solve issues related to the environment and energy.

We aim to produce graduates with multifaceted perspectives on the Earth and human society through teaching Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, and to provide them with practical skills, all while endeavoring to enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

Department of Applied Physics

The Department of Applied Physics has formulated the following curriculum to achieve the goal of producing graduates able to contribute to the advancement and popularization of physics and related fields.

Building on the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, Cluster III’s specialized subjects in four areas—the fields of 1) general physics and applied physics, 2) physical properties and materials, 3) physical data measurement, and 4) electronics—develop an understanding of various fields and the ability to think logically through wide-ranging studies, while referring to the respective course models.

Expertise cultivated during those studies are applied to graduation research as well as various engineering problems, and used to master methods of analysis. Further, we aim to produce graduates with multifaceted perspectives on the natural world and human society through teaching Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, and to provide them with practical skills, all while endeavoring to enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering

The Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering has formulated the following curriculum to achieve the goal of producing graduates that can employ mechanical engineering’s constituent technologies alongside English-language skills as a communication tool in global careers.

Building on the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, Cluster III’s specialized subjects focus on the four types of dynamics related to machinery—industrial dynamics, strength of materials, thermodynamics, and hydrodynamics. In the process, students also master technical English, focusing on conversational skills. They are also taught programming so that they can employ control engineering and expertise to metal materials and medical devices, developing comprehensive skills that will enable them to participate in designing, producing and developing various kinds of machines.

To that end, students master skills that will enable them to solve specific industrial issues through their graduation research.

Further, we aim to produce graduates with multifaceted perspectives on the Earth and human society through teaching Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, and to provide them with practical skills, all while endeavoring to enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

Faculty of Engineering

Department of Mechanical Engineering

We have formulated the following curriculum to achieve the goal of producing graduates that can play active roles in a wide range of fields, primarily in manufacturing.

Building on the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, Cluster III’s specialized subjects—which are based on the core principles of mechanical engineering—students are taught the principles of machinery, going beyond the mechanisms to include materials and manufacturing methods. In this way, they develop the creativity and comprehensive skills to efficiently and reliably design and produce machines with new functions.

To that end, we have created the Eco-Energy course for students to master methods of resolving energy-related issues, and the Mechano-Design course, in which they learn about methods of solving issues related to hardware design, as they work on their graduation research.

We aim to produce graduates with multifaceted perspectives on the Earth and human society through teaching Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, and to provide them with practical skills, all while endeavoring to enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering

The Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering’s goal is to produce graduates that can play roles in two combined fields—mechanical engineering and systems engineering. Our learning and educational objectives to achieve that are outlined below. On the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, we teach Cluster III’s specialized subjects, which are based on the core areas of mechanical engineering—mechanics, materials, design, electronic machinery, and industrial engineering. Students acquire basic expertise in mechanical systems—a field that combines interdisciplinary areas of science and technology—developing the skills to plan, design and supervise, as well as flexibility and creativity. We also formulate curricula to foster creativity with multifaceted perspectives on the Earth and human society through Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, as well as to provide them with practical skills and enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering aims to produce graduates who can play active roles in fostering a sustainable advanced information society. To that end, we have formulated the following curriculum, which focuses on energy, electronics and systems. While increasing their understanding of society’s multifaceted aspects and of other cultures in Cluster I’s general culture and foreign-language courses, students develop the keen awareness to recognize the relationship between society and the skills acquired in this department. As they acquire basic expertise and learning general concepts mainly related to physics and math in Cluster II’s common basic subjects, they also learn methods for putting these into practice.

Students study the basics in four areas—electromagnetics, circuit theory, electronic properties, and system controls—in Cluster II’s specialized subjects. Including advanced content in those four areas, students acquire expertise required by technicians in electrical and electronic engineering in Cluster III’s specialized subjects. Further, they develop the ability to use that expertise in lab work and seminars. They develop the skills to think about technical issues comprehensively, to discuss with others, and to share information in third- and fourth-year seminars, as well as through their graduation theses.

In this fashion, our department has formulated curricula that provide students with a liberal arts education, developing their logical thinking skills as they master the use of physics, math, and basic electrical and electronic engineering expertise, enabling them to acquire skills that will contribute to identifying and solving technical problems.

School of Architecture

Department of Urban Design and Planning

During four years of education and their graduation research in the School of Architecture, students build their foundation through Cluster A’s general education and natural sciences courses, acquire core architectural skills in Cluster B’s specialized courses, and develop multifaceted perspectives regarding the Earth and human society to improve the engineering-related ethics and communication skills they will need to become specialists with practical skills. The Department of Urban Design and Planning additionally provides an understanding of multifaceted expertise related to urban development skills, so that students develop the skills needed to propose highly feasible models for future cities.

Department of Architecture

During four years of education and their graduation research in the School of Architecture, students build their foundation through Cluster A’s general education and natural sciences courses, acquire core architectural skills in Cluster B’s specialized courses, and develop multifaceted perspectives regarding the Earth and human society to improve the engineering-related ethics and communication skills they will need to become specialists with practical skills. The Department of Architecture additionally provides multifaceted understanding related to the high level of core skills and expertise needed to create structures that last and can be recycled as resources, so that students develop the ability to propose new architectural modes for the future.

Department of Architectural Design

During four years of education and their graduation research in the School of Architecture, students build their foundation through Cluster A’s general education and natural sciences courses, acquire core architectural skills in Cluster B’s specialized courses, and develop multifaceted perspectives regarding the Earth and human society to improve the engineering-related ethics and communication skills they will need to become specialists with practical skills. The Department of Architectural Design additionally provides multifaceted understanding of environmental considerations and improvement in human quality of life, so that students develop the ability to propose architectural designs that benefit people.

Faculty of Informatics

Department of Information and Communications Engineering

The Department of Information and Communications Engineering has formulated the following curriculum to achieve the goal of producing graduates who can identify and resolve issues as professionals while applying their expertise related to information and communication engineering.

Building on the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, Cluster III’s specialized subjects teach them about the basic technologies of electronic circuits and devices, communications networks, digital media and software, developing the practical skills needed for tackling engineering problems through lab work and seminars.

To that end, we have created courses on telecommunications and networks, information media, and smart devices so that students can acquire specialized knowledge through their graduation research.

We also aim to produce graduates with multifaceted perspectives on the Earth and human society through teaching Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, and to provide them with practical skills, all while endeavoring to enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

Department of Computer Science

The Department of Computer Science has formulated the following curriculum to achieve the goal of producing graduates who will be indispensable to an advanced information society due to their ability to use computers in sophisticated ways.

Building on the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, Cluster III’s specialized subjects give students the basics of information systems, software development techniques, applications for such things as image and speech recognition, and data security, developing the skills they will need to manage computer systems in an advanced information society.

To that end, we have created courses on software, computer applications and information security so that students can acquire specialized knowledge through their graduation research.

Further, we aim to produce graduates with multifaceted perspectives on the Earth and human society through teaching Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, and to provide them with practical skills, all while endeavoring to enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

Department of Information Design

The Department of Information Design has formulated the following curriculum to achieve the goal of producing graduates who will be able to competently design and develop efficient, effective ways of using information in pursuit of a people-friendly information society.

Building on the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, Cluster III’s specialized subjects reveal the links between people and the information society through the basics of information networks and data processing related to images and audio. Students develop the information design skills to identify and solve the problems of the information society. To that end, we have created courses on human information processing, content design and knowledge and information so that students can acquire specialized knowledge through their graduation research.

In addition, we aim to produce graduates with multifaceted perspectives on the Earth and human society through teaching Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, and to provide them with practical skills, all while endeavoring to enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

Department of Information Systems and Applied Mathematics

The Department of Information Systems and Applied Mathematics has formulated the following curriculum to achieve the goal of producing graduates able to plan, devise, and operate the data systems that companies and society require.

Building on the foundations of the basic subjects that first- and second-year students study in Cluster II, students learn about the basic elemental technologies related to IT infrastructure in Cluster III’s specialized subjects, getting the basics of practical systems configuration, data science and management informatics. Comprehensively employing these basic specialized technologies in graduation research, students develop the skills to identify issues in the real world and propose IT systems designed to resolve them.

We also aim to produce graduates with multifaceted perspectives on the Earth and human society through teaching Cluster I’s subjects, such as general cultures, and to provide them with practical skills, all while endeavoring to enhance their engineering-related ethics and communication skills.

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